3 missiles target US embassy in Baghdad, Iraqi officials say

Members of the Iraqi security forces can be seen outside the US embassy in Baghdad, Iraq.  (Image: Reuters)

Members of the Iraqi security forces can be seen outside the US embassy in Baghdad, Iraq. (Image: Reuters)

The embassy’s C-RAM defense system was used to destroy the missiles in the air, three Iraqi security officials said, damaging property and parked cars.

  • PTI
  • Last updated: December 21, 2020, 7:07 am IST
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At least three missiles targeted the U.S. embassy in Baghdad’s heavily fortified green zone on Sunday, Iraqi security officials said, sparking fears of renewed unrest as the anniversary of the assassination of an Iranian general approached next month.

The embassy’s C-RAM defense system was used to destroy the missiles in the air, three Iraqi security officials said, damaging property and parked cars. It wasn’t immediately clear whether there were victims. The officers spoke on condition of anonymity in accordance with regulations.

The US installed the C-RAM system in the summer when armed groups intensified rocket attacks on the embassy and its premises.

The US withdrew some staff from its embassy in Baghdad earlier this month and cut staff temporarily ahead of the first anniversary of the assassination of Iranian General Qassim Soleimani by Washington outside Baghdad airport on January 3. US officials said the decision was due to concerns of a possible retaliation.

Soleimani’s murder sparked outrage and prompted the Iraqi parliament days later to pass a non-binding resolution calling for the expulsion of all foreign troops from Iraq. The frequency of missile attacks has frustrated the Trump administration. Iran-backed militia groups were accused of orchestrating the attacks.

In September, Washington warned Iraq that it would close its embassy in Baghdad if the government fails to take decisive action to end missile and other attacks by Iranian-backed militias on American and allied interests in the country.

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